If you’ve read papers in the past week, you’ll have noticed that the game Celtic won on Sunday has hardly featured at all in the .

You have to hand it to King and his board; they know the media here has a short attention span and doesn’t really want to have to write anything too ant-Ibrox, and so he threw some scraps, a wee piece of “feel-good” and they lapped them up.

But the real story, of course, is that game and how Celtic won that game  and how it will impact on the rest of the season.

Leagues aren’t won or lost at this of year, that’s what people tell you.

But what happens at this time of year can, and does, set the tone for the .

The media knows this.

They were hinting at it before the match kicked off, when it was going to define the Celtic relationship with the manager … negatively.

It was, if you believed what you were reading, going to reopen all the old wounds and put him under incredible pressure from inside the Celtic stands.

They know a win for the home club would have mattered and that it would have made Neil Lennon’s situation difficult for a while, a while in which any bad result could have provoked a .

There’s no point in pretending that wouldn’t been the response of some in our support.

Depending on how bad the result was, I might have been writing some of the harsher things myself.

It was a big test for everyone at Celtic, but I always had the feeling we’d pull it off because of many of the reasons I’m going to talk about in this piece.

But for the press to pretend it’s a result that ultimately doesn’t matter now is disingenuous nonsense and pro-Ibrox .

This result matters alright, and this piece is going to examine the reasons why it does, and why, when we look back after securing nine in a row, this will be seen as one of the pivotal days in the campaign which made it happen.